19 Eylül 2017 Salı
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Places for Worship

 

Alaybey Mosque:  The mosque as it stands today shows the architectural characteristics of early 17th century mosques. The structure is made of red sandstone ashlar. Courtyard out front features small cemetery.

Hagia Marina Church: The Greek Orthodox church is located in Kaleköy Liman, Gökçeada Island

Hagia Marina Church: The Greek Orthodox church is located in Dereköy, Gökçeada Island

Hagia Panaghia Church: The Greek Orthodox church is located in Çınarlı, Gökçeada Island.

Agia Varvara Church: The Greek Orthodox church is located in Yenimahalle, Gökçeada Island.

Azebler Mosque (Namazgah): This unusual looking outdoor mosque is located on the peninsula overlooking the sea on a headland near the lighthouse. It was built in 1407 and features a white marble mihrab that indicates the direction of Mecca and a pulpit.

Biga Çarşı Mosque: The mosque and the fountain (for ritual ablution) were built by Gazi Umur in 15th century and heavily damaged after a fire. The fountain was/is the stone basin with a domed canopy made of wood clad resting on pillars linked by arches. They were restored to their former glory in 1911 with the style bearing the hallmarks of Italian architecture (Baroque).

Biga Ulu Mosque: It was built by Fatih Sultan Mehmet in 1500. The foundation walls were built with a combination of stone and brick. Brick/stone texture was achieved by the use of alternating layers of the two. The obvious contrast of the two materials is striking.

Cahidi Sultan Mosque: Situated atop a hill slopes in Kilitbahir Village, Eceabat, the mosque with the tomb of Cahidi Efendi has tantalising views of the Dardanelles.

Evangelismos Church: The Greek Orthodox church is located inTepeköy, Gökçeada Island.

Fatih Mosque:  The mosque in Fevzi Paşa Neighbourhood, town centre was built by Fatih Sultan Mehmet in 1462.   

Hüdavendigar Mosque: The square-plan 14th century Ottoman Mosque was built with ancient masonry but without one of the most recognisable features of Islamic architecture – minaret. With its austere appearance, it is perched on top of a hill, dominating the ancient site of Assos.

Issız Cuma Mosque: This mosque is simple yet beautiful and serene framed by large, shadowy plane trees. It was built in 1335 by Gazi Osman Paşa and constructed of wooden columns supporting a wooden roof covered by clay tiles. There is also a small graveyard adjacent to the mosque.

Mekor Hayim Sinagog (Havra): Every October, Jewish people from İstanbul gather together in the 120 year old synagogue to celebrate Shabbat (a day of rest and spiritual rejuvenation). 

Virgin Mary Church: The Greek Orthodox church is located in Bozcaada Island.

Metropolitan Kilisesi (Gökçeada - Merkez): The Greek Orthodox church is located in the town centre, Gökçeada Island.

Tıflı Mosque: The mosque in the city centre was built by Sultan II. Abdülhamit tarafından in 1892. The name of the mosque, “Tıflı” means “child” in Arabic.

Tis Theotokos Kilisesi (Gökçeada - Dereköy): The Greek Orthodox church is located in Dereköy, Gökçeada Island.

Yalı Mosque: The mosque in the city centre was built by Tavil Ahmet Ağa in 1884.